So did Buganda become great at the expense of Bunyoro

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Guys,
For me I am fed up with this Bunyoro gloating about the emergence and present prominence of Buganda.
Surely at the time of coming of the British, Buganda had long overtaken Bunyoro and the fact that Baganda are the dominant tribal force in Uganda today in all spheres be it social, political, economic, intellectual, sport, music and entertainment cannot just be because they at one time are adjudged to have gained at the expense of Bunyoro.
Mirima conveniently never tells anyone about the rise of Ankole, Toro or Karagwe that were all said to have been part of Bunyoro Kitara. Henry, how and when did those parts of Bunyoro Kitara break away from your Kingdom?
We should never forget that greatness cannot be stopped however much one tries to impede it.
Museveni has tried to impede Buganda, but even he knows that its next to impossible because we are every where, in all domains Uganda!
We are the brightest, most innovative, bravest, most enterprising, etc, and there is no way anyone or anything in Uganda can stop us, and this is not to say that we have any sense of chauvinism in us. Its just a fact.
The likes of Mirima just have to get used to this fact!

Rita Mbabazi

About ekitibwakyabuganda

Ba Ssebo ne ba Nyabo, Twebaza Abaganda bonna abulumulirwa Obuganda . Era twebaza ne mikwano gya Buganda gyonna wonna wegiri munsi yonna. Omukutu guno gwatandikibwawo nga e’kigendererwa kwe kuyigiriza abantu ebintu ebikwatagana no’Buganda era nokuwanyisiganya ebilowozo nebanaffe abatali Baganda. Abaganda ne mikwano gya Buganda mukozese omukisa guno muwereze ebirowozo byamwe no’bubaka bwona obunaagasa Abaganda na’baana Buganda berizala mu maaso eyo. Obumu ku bubaka obuwerezebwa ku mukutu guno bugyibwa mukuwanyisiganya ebirowozo okubera kumukutu gwa Ugandan’s at Heart (UAH) Forum ogwatandikibwawo Mwami Abbey Kibirige Semuwemba. Era twebaza muzukulu wa Kintu ne Nnambi ono olw’omulimu gwakoledde bana Uganda bonna abali e’bunayira mungeri yo kubagatta mu byempuliziganya no’kutumbula okukolaganira awamu.

4 responses »

  1. Rita Mbabazi, for the first time , l have agreed with you on Buganda-Bunyoro relations as portrayed by our elder Mirima. Let Bunyoro first claim lost counties to Congo before those else where. Did Bunyoro only loose Buganda? Why not Nkore, Mpororo, Tooro, Karagwe, Kiziba, Rwanda, Burundi, Wanga, Busoga, as you have realy shown?
    Ahmed Katerega
    Newvision

  2. Allow me to share this well written article I recently came across on the issue of Buganda’s pre-imminence;

    Buganda’s Demise
    By J. Basudde http://www.federo.com/index.php?id=142

    The country’s turmoil that continues to be second nature to Ugandans is most often seen in the dilapidation and negligence of our cities and the country’s infrastructure. But the deeper, less visible, and much longer-lasting rupture is in the moral fabric of our society.

    Since shortly after independence, there has not been any moral leadership. The emphasis of all—with the exception of Professor Lule’s rather brief tenure—of our leadership has been on self-aggrandizement and lifetime presidencies, militarism and, of course the unfailing promotion of ethnic antagonism to obscure the corruption and managerial failures.

    In my view, the biggest problem in establishing stability in Uganda—never mind “democracy”–is that Africans do not have any concept of nationhood. We think nearly exclusively in terms of our ethnicity. Ethnic hatred has been clearly exemplified in several different postings recently by non-Baganda in Uganda’s newspapers and on FedsNet, in which they express their glee about Buganda’s perceived—and much hoped for—“demise.” This is rather unfortunate, because the hatred for Buganda is not because she exploited the other regions, but because Buganda dared to develop. And she still is the most developed.

    We’ve all heard and read, from the most popular school of thought on Buganda that THE reason for Buganda’s historical centrality in what is now Uganda is: The bazungu gave preferential treatment to Buganda from 1900 to independence, in 1962, and that’s why Buganda was able to move ahead of the others.

    62 years

    Actually, by the time the British came to Buganda, the Baganda already had a viable administrative system solidly in place. This entity was now part of the Kiganda culture. Using one’s intellectual abilities to function well in society and to advance in government had become the preferred alternative to violence. Buganda’s culture had, therefore, an internalized social order [self-restraint], stability and cohesion. – Buganda was civilized.

    “Modern” Times

    Uganda is blessed with natural resources, clement weather, water and fertile land. At independence, there was a relatively large professional and comfortable middle class, which included doctors, teachers, businessmen, the clergy, lawyers, and even scientists.

    Uganda has now been ruled by non-Baganda from 1962 to the present [2005]. Fully 43 years. [Muwanga and Binaisa were proxies for non-Baganda interests. Professor Yusuf Lule lasted a mere 68 days, which were full of intrigue and sabotage against him].

    During most of the past 43 years of “independence,” there were, and still are, systematic and unwavering efforts to decimate everything Kiganda, impoverish Buganda and, as a result of these unwavering efforts, at least a million of her people have been killed, raped, orphaned, widowed, maimed, brutalized, forced into exile, and their land and property stolen by successive, fraudulent government decrees.

    Meanwhile, these non-Baganda rulers were presented with enviable and numerous opportunities to develop Uganda. They had far, far more access to local and international funds, loans, grants, modern technology, external expertise, direct financial aid and investment, and exposure to developed countries than Buganda ever had in all her history.

    Yet, with negligible exceptions, the schools, hospitals and infrastructure are either dysfunctional, dilapidated or, more often than not, both; corruption and theft are de rigueur in government and society; morality and responsibility for one’s actions are non-existent; living standards are well below what they were at the time of independence [and, remember, people were already poor in 1962]; crime [physical assault, murders] is rampant; unemployment is in the double-digits, and only pockets of individuals from the ethnic group that happens to be in power at any given time have benefited–through theft, massive corruption, intimidation, murder and cronyism. The rule of law has been replaced by the rule of government agents and prosecutors, who interpret the law to suit their careers, agendas and friends.

    But to divert people’s attention from the corruption, mismanagement and incompetence that define them, Uganda’s rulers have focused on demonising Buganda—through disinformation, obfuscation and fabrication—as the cause for nearly everything wrong with the country. Their method is to divide and rule, because they lack the concept of nationhood, and are seeking only self-aggrandizement. The realization that if a region other than theirs grows is beneficial to all is simply not in their sight of vision. They regard it as a threat to their freedom to plunder and control, instead.

    Kampala, for instance, is flooded with non-Baganda seeking jobs, yet employment opportunities are few to none. The city’s physical limitations cannot accommodate them, so they live in slums, and the resultant squalor and poverty contribute greatly to the crime rate.

    The most practical solution to this quagmire would be devolution of the power structure [federalism] so that the other regions can have more power in collecting and spending their taxes for themselves. Regional development would greatly ease the burden on Kampala and its social services.

    Back to Buganda

    Despite the concerted efforts of these rulers to eradicate Buganda, she remains the only place in the entire country where there is any cohesion. When people talk about Uganda’s “culture,” it’s Buganda’s they are talking about; when they talk about civility, it’s Buganda’s. Industriousness? Baganda’s. Buganda is the place that non-Baganda love to hate, insult, abuse, denigrate, steal from—-but never, ever want to leave. Why? I believe it is because they realize the following, albeit reluctantly: Baganda are industrious; Kiganda society is civilized and advanced, and therefore more stable and accepting of others, and thus it is more conducive to business than the others. It is the country’s engine. The Baganda have a work ethic, and a can-do attitude. Buganda, therefore, is the place to “make it.” And yet, the demonization continues!

    The damage done to the country by the governments’ discrediting of Buganda’s achievements is deep and unrelenting.

    (1) Demonising and brutalizing the most stable, most advanced and industrious segment of the country shows a vision deficit, and a high degree of irresponsibility. Such actions only fuel hatred and only obfuscate the corruption and incompetence in the short run, much to the country’s detriment;

    (2) By falsely discrediting Buganda’s achievements, and speciously attributing her advancement to British “preferential treatment”, the rulers are sending a strong, very destructive message to the non-Baganda, which is: Africans cannot have an advanced society without European help and, therefore, do not expect to advance beyond your present station, because Africans are just not capable of development on their own. [This message is firmly reinforced into the public psyche daily by the government’s massive failures to provide even the most basic of social services];

    (3) When people believe that their regions are inherently incapable, the educated few and able among them resolve to focus on self, rather than their regions’ development, and are thus co-opted into corruption as the only means out of poverty;

    (4) But, in the midst of discrediting Buganda comes the undeniable, irrefutable recognition that yes, in fact, Buganda was able to achieve on her own. This recognition is then turned into hatred because the Baganda dared be African and able. But, rather than striving to meet their responsibility and obligation to develop the country—to catch up with Buganda, if you will—the rulers find massacring, demonizing, and marginalizing the Baganda easier; genuine development is too hard: It requires administrative responsibility, planning, sacrifice, fiscal and self-discipline. The rulers just do not have the desire, confidence and vision to reach this level of maturity. This is why federalism—a system through which regions can have a genuine say in their development—is anathema. It would, if instituted, necessitate accountability, especially for public funds, provide efficient social services, fairness in government hiring, put a stop to one-man rule, cronyism, and ethnic manipulation to divert attention from incompetence.

    Fear of Competition

    It is because of a well-founded lack of confidence in African governments and our leadership that a large number of Ugandans say, “Let’s keep Museveni. At least we can sleep at night.” What they do not mean by this is, “Museveni’s government is competent and able, and, therefore, will improve our living standards.” No. What they are saying is, “We expect nothing but mediocrity, corruption and cronyism from an African government, so why change this one for the same failures when at least Museveni’s is not killing as many of us as the previous ones?” What a sad commentary on African administrative abilities and ethics.

    It is high time that non-Baganda ask themselves the following:

    (1) If, in fact, Buganda’s reason for being advanced was due to British influence, should there not be tangible, noticeable development in the rest of Uganda by now, forty years after independence? Why, instead, are we poorer than we were before independence?

    (2) Who is going to develop our region, if not ourselves? How do we do it without access to taxation and regional decision-making?

    While I believe whole-heartedly that Uganda’s future lies in federalism, I also believe that Buganda’s [and other ethnicities] long-term survival is in being proportionately represented in the Army and defense forces. Africa is still very tribalistic, so much so that precautions must be taken to safeguard against ethnic cleansing. Fair and equal representation in the African armies in one way of avoiding another Rwanda. It would be a mistake to think it cannot happen. This time, in Uganda.

  3. Dear Rita Mbabazi

    Kindly advise me on what yardsticks you have used to reach the conclusion that ” We are the brightest, most innovative, bravest, most enterprising, etc, and there is no way anyone or anything in Uganda can stop us, and this is not to say that we have any sense of chauvinism in us. Its just a fact.” There is some research goingon in some parts of the Western world about whether or not the long held view that the white caucasian is the “brightest, most innovative, bravest, most enterprising” does hold true. I would therefore appreciate your views on this

    I would also like to know what you mean by the word Baganda and how does one determine who is or is not a Muganda? Is it in name or lineage? Does the fact that one has a parent who is or was not a muganda make him or her less of a muganda? Does that in anyway contribute to the “social, political, economic, intellectual, sport, music and entertainment” prowess of the Muganda? Have any advantages of location, timing, former colonisation etc been considered when coming to this conclusion? or are all these attributed to “in-born”natural occurences by merely being a Muganda?

    Interestingly, if the latter be true then its worth noting that our colonial masters, the Nazis and many of those who have subjugated others in history, have equally held similar darwinian? views

    A question for Mr Ahmed Kateregga, does it really matter which claim Bunyoro should lodge first for the recovery of its land-if it beleives it has such claim? Willl claiming land from any of these other places resolve the claim it has against Buganda(whether such claim is justifiable or not?) Doesnt it defeat logic for one to delay an isue rather than go around in circles? In my view, we would rather ask Bunyoro or any other nationality of ethnic group to forego any claim they might have in the interest of national unity and development. A claim and counter claim will not help us

    I await your responses

  4. Dear Edmund

    Thank you for this post of Basudde’s article and please allow me to make a few observations

    I am very surprised by the views expressed by Mr Basudde and wonder whether he really took time to consider what exactly he was communicating?

    Anyone reading this article without the benefit of self control or wisdom would surely see Basudde’s article as egoistic, biased, tribaistic, divisive, unethic and clealry wrong

    His unsubstantiated views are almost meant to annoy and anger. Its as though he has decided to provoke hostility towards the Baganda

    I wonder what comes to your mind-honestly-when you read this….”..when people talk about Uganda’s “culture,” it’s Buganda’s they are talking about; when they talk about civility, it’s Buganda’s. Industriousness? Baganda’s. Buganda is the place that non-Baganda love to hate, insult, abuse, denigrate, steal from—-but never, ever want to leave. Why? I believe it is because they realize the following, albeit reluctantly: Baganda are industrious; Kiganda society is civilized and advanced, and therefore more stable and accepting of others, and thus it is more conducive to business than the others. It is the country’s engine. The Baganda have a work ethic, and a can-do attitude. Buganda, therefore, is the place to “make it.” And yet, the demonization continues!” Would you be surpised as a stranger walking into the room called Uganda if people were hostile to Buganda? After such a tirrade or unrealistic proportions?

    I leave that up to you to judge

    Daniel

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